Publication details.

Paper

Year:2016
Author(s):X. Rotllàn, A. Traveset
Title:Declining relict plants: Climate effect or seed dispersal disruption? A landscape-scale approach
Journal:BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY
ISSN:1439-1791
JCR Impact Factor:2.292
Volume:17
Issue No.:1
Pages:81-91
D.O.I.:10.1016/j.baae.2015.08.003
Web:http://www.researchgate.net/c/nwtt5h/javascript/lib/pdfjs/web/viewer.html?file=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.researchgate.net%2Fprofile%2FXavier_Rotllan-Puig%2Fpublication%2F280881357_Declining_relict_plants_Climate_effect_or_seed_dispersal_disruption_A_landscape-scale_approach%2Flinks%2F55e5520b08aecb1a7ccb9bc2.pdf%3FinViewer%3D1%26pdfJsDownload%3Dtrue%26disableCoverPage%3Dtrue%26origin%3Dpublication_detail
Abstract:
loss,
including
the
decrease
of
diversity
of
ecological
interactions,
is
known
to
reduce
the
capacity
of
ecosystems
to
cope
with
the
effects
of
global
change.
Here
we
assessed
whether
the
distribution
and
survival
of
two
declining
relict
plant
species,
Daphne
rodriguezii
and
Cneorum
tricoccon
,
were
affected
by
the
mutualism
disruption
with
their
only
seed-disperser
and
by
climatic
and
habitat
conditions.
Due
to
the
lack
of
data
on
demographic
rates,
we
used
an
indirect
approach
to
test
these
hypotheses.
We
used
presence–absence
data
as
response
variables
and
took
two
distinct
sets
of
predictors
(i.e.
habitat
and
topoclimatic
conditions),
which
were
hypothesized
to
be
the
main
determinants
of
the
demographic
rates
under
question.
With
these
two
datasets
we
fitted
species
distribution
models
by
means
of
MaxEnt.
Such
models
were
later
used
to
build
Combined
Species
Distributions
Models
(CM).
For
each
plant
species,
these
CM
allowed
evaluating
the
role
of
both
climatic
and
non-climatic
factors,
such
as
the
mutualism
disruption.
Results
showed
that
both
climate
and
habitat
conditions
determined
the
current
distribution
of
the
two
species
at
a
landscape
scale.
Additionally,
the
mutualism
disruption
between
C.
tricoccon
and
its
native
seed-disperser
affected
plant
distribution,
moving
it
to
areas
where
a
new
alien
disperser
was
present.
This
alien
disperser
modified
the
pattern
of
habitat
selection
by
plants
in
terms
of
habitat
quality,
reducing
their
presence
in
suboptimal
areas,
which
might
be
the
determinant
for
their
survival.
Our
findings
highlight
the
need
of
a
better
understanding
of
the
role
of
mutualisms
within
natural
communities
in
order
to
undertake
appropriate
conservation
actions
on
threatened
plant
populations.
Furthermore,
acting
on
key
factors
affecting
plant–disperser
disruptions
(e.g.
controlling
invasive
species)
might
help
to
mitigate
the
effects
of
global
change
on
declining
relict
plants

Related staff

  • Anna Traveset Vilagines
  • Related research groups

  • Global Change Research